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Friday, December 01, 2006

iTunes Gadget for Google Homepage

After a couple weeks of hard work in my spare time, I've finally finished the iTunes Gadget for Google Homepage. Apple iTunes Music Store has an XML feed and googol Homepage API allows personalization of web content. So I thought, why not put my Flash skills to work and create an iTunes Gadget? So by analyzing the iTunes XML feed, I was able to dissect the parameters of various genre, music store location, and the number of items to display, send it to Flash "scrollPane". All user selections are saved automatically to make it easy to use. Did I mention it is Free? Anyway, enjoy!

Wednesday, September 20, 2006

New iPods and Zune

Last week was an interesting week! First Apple updated iPod, iTunes, then Microsoft announced its Zune players.

With Apple's announcement, it was so much thunder but no rain! Nano now has 5 different colors, iTunes now delivers movie downloads. It was more about what it means than what it does. Without HD content or a link to the big plasma TV, I don't see people will want to watch movies on the little iPod players.

Zune, what a big piece of crap from a big company with design committees. I was hoping for a fresh new angle from Microsoft, maybe finally some competition for the iPod and iTunes. But Noooooo. What I see was a half baked player that promotes "Sharing". But wait, it is really not "Sharing" because it just let people listen for the songs several times then it was bookmarked for purchase in the future.

Are Microsoft marketing programs run by amateurs? How stupid do they think the consumer are? What is the point of going through the trouble and listening to songs from your friend, there is no value in this type of "sharing". This is like to include a phone in a TV back in the 80's. There is just so little functional advantage for a phone in a TV that it was never a big selling point for Zenith!

Thursday, August 03, 2006

Metallica on iTunes

Metallica, the heavy metal band finally releases its catalog of songs on iTunes. After the 2000 fiasco for suing Napster, the group finally embraces the Internet.

What we can learn from the band is that whenever a new technology somebody, don't jump to conclusions and over reacted. As it turns out, Napster was a fad. Sharing copyrighted songs on the p2p network can't compete with quality, legal, easy to use iTunes.

Friday, July 28, 2006

It has been two years?

I can't believe it has been two years since my last post. A lot has changed. iPod is now the most popular MP3 player one the market and iTunes has sold more than one billion songs. Metallica even sells their songs online!

I am a big fan of iPod and Apple's iTunes online music store. But like many stores, they are not necessarily making the music that I want easy for ME to find. I mean, I'm not a music expert that remembers popular song names or artist names at drop of a hat. I want to find songs that fit the mood I'm in, music that fits different occasion or activity that I'm in.

Here comes CapTunes.com!

Apple is smart enough to provide tools to developers like me. So I've compiled many many songs and, it took me a while, and it is not finished yet... But CapTunes.com now has hundreds of links directly to the specific song in iTunes! On top of the links, you can even copy the "iTunes" button and attached in an e-mail to send to a friend. How cool is that?

Well, there are still lots of songs I want to be included on the site, but it was a good start nevertheless.

Tuesday, June 22, 2004

RIAA has too much power over individual freedom of speech

First, I just like to say that I do not condone Napster or KaZaa style music copying.

Yesterday, my friend trys to upload MP3 files of HIS OWN BAND performance, and his Comcast web server just automatically delete those MP3 files. I'm sorry, but this is just WRONG!

My friend paid $45 a month for his broadband access and web server, he should be able to do everything if it is legal. But if Comcast is afraid of RIAA and putting restriction on a perfectly legitimate situation, especially when my friend do not have suitable alternative broadband provider in the area, this is not right.

Record companies just don't get it. They should make it easy for people to enjoy music, not make it harder. This is just a transitional period for the music industry: from physical distribution to virtual distribution. AND they should not overreach their field of business and into people's private lives.